Category: Book reviews

Book review: ALIENS: BUG HUNT (edited by Jonathan Maberry)

The ALIEN expanded universe now covers many media. We’ve had comic books, novels, video games and more recently even a new board game. However, BUG HUNT treads new ground. Sure, we’ve seen original fiction set in the ALIEN universe before, in the form of Dark Horse comics and novels, but this is the first time…


Book review: CARCHARODONS – RED TITHE by Robbie MacNiven

Black Library increasingly takes us into new and unexplored territory, with the hardback release of CARCHARODONS – RED TITHE. The first full-length novel to feature the Carcharodon Astra (also known as the Space Sharks), this book is also the first full-length outing from author Robbie MacNiven. The Sharks are one of those Space Marine chapters…


Book review: TALES FROM THE FORBIDDEN ZONE

The PLANET OF THE APES franchise has proved to be an enduring one: a series that has developed from a single film (which itself was based on a book), into a series of movies, books, comics and more. The 1968 original film spawned a whole host of sequels, and from the early days of APES…


Book review: THE MEDUSA CHRONICLES by Stephen Baxter & Alastair Reynolds

  Verdict: A very enjoyable extension of Arthur C Clarke’s original novella The premise for MEDUSA CHRONICLES is interesting of itself: the story is based on (and really a sequel to) Arthur C Clarke’s 1971 A MEETING WITH MEDUSA. Clarke’s original story met with critical acclaim, and is widely regarded as being one of his…


Book review: NOMAD by Alan Partridge

Verdict: Another chapter in Alan’s life that you won’t want to miss Alan Partridge is recognised as being the – or certainly one of the – premier faces of mid-morning radio in the North Norfolk area. Part presenter, part businessman and all Alan, you’d think that Partridge is the man with everything. And yet something…


Book review: NOD by Adrian Barnes

Verdict: Insomnia has never been so scary, but the book reflects the subject matter NOD is based on the premise that overnight the vast majority of Earth’s population lose the ability to sleep. Like most good stories, the concept is simple. Firmly in the disaster or apocalypse genre, Barnes’ tale develops the impact that sleep-deprivation has…


Book review: STATION ELEVEN by Emily St John Mandel

Verdict: Life-affirming and terrifying in equal measure; this is beautiful literary SF STATION ELEVEN, by Emily St John Mandel, was the winner of the 2015 Arthur C Clarke award. It’s generated much acclaim, and it’s one of those books that I’d been meaning to read for a while. As I’ve said before on this blog,…


Book review: ROBOTEER by Alex Lamb

  Verdict: Thoroughly enjoyable hard SF ROBOTEER’s backdrop is a war between two human factions: the Earthers and the Galateans. The Earthers are presented as religious fanatics, driven to war with the Galateans as a result of the latter’s practice of human modification (labelling them “genetic fascists” and “capitalists”). Will Monet is a Galatean “roboteer”…


Book review: NEMESIS GAMES by James SA Corey

  Verdict: Possibly the best book in THE EXPANSE series to date I’m a regular and avid reader. I must have a book in progress. I don’t like leaving the house without a book. I can’t help thinking of all those gaps in my day when I could be reading… A ten minute wait at a…


Book review: THE LAST DAYS OF JACK SPARKS by Jason Arnopp

  Verdict: An engaging thriller with a fresh voice If, like me, you have a pretty rigid pattern of reading habits, sometimes it’s not easy to step outside genre parameters. I’m an avid reader of SF, which admittedly is a broad field, but it’s rare that I read a book outside of that genre. In…


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